Budweiser, homosexuality and public school kids

By Don Hinkle
Apr 9, 2008

Southern Baptists have always taken strong stands against the consumption of alcoholic beverages and given all the surprising debate in the Missouri Baptist Convention (MBC) concerning the topic one has to wonder if the state’s largest evangelical denomination has the will to fight the latest controversy in Missouri.

State Rep. Curt Dougherty, D-Independence, wants the “King of Beers” to have a new place of honor by making Budweiser the official beer of Missouri. That’s right. Our taxpayer dollars are going to a state lawmaker who wants to pass “important” legislation like this.

Isn’t it enough that such “vital” legislation like naming a state dinosaur, a state frog (no, it’s not Kermit) and a state nut (some think there are already too many at the State Capitol) has already passed?

“We tout our (Kansas City) Chiefs and our St. Louis football teams, why can’t we be proud of a long-standing company that produces a product with ingredients produced mostly in the United States?” Dougherty said.

Could it be because of irresponsible use of that product that has destroyed too many lives? The bill was introduced earlier this month, but has not been referred to a House committee. Let us hope it never will be.

Edward Solce, Jr., a Pathway reader in Heron, Mont., wrote me last week urging me to speak out on the issue. He eloquently captures the essence of this frivolous piece of proposed legislation: “I certainly do not feel that Missouri taxpayers should have their tax dollars spent for a cause that promotes a corporation in the brewery business. That is simply not ethical. In fact, it totally lacks integrity, let alone being full of tremendous insensitivity and disrespect.”

Homosexuality and public school kids

How much influence do homosexuals now have in our public schools in Missouri? More than 20 schools have apparently caved-in to the homosexual activists and will participate in the so-called “Day of Silence” observance April 25. Homosexual activists will tell us it is to remember homosexuals who have been murdered allegedly because of their lifestyle, but the reality is something else. It is part of a national strategy to gain widespread acceptance of their lifestyle—especially in our public school system.

A “Day of Silence” is brought to you courtesy of two anti-traditional family organizations: the Gay, Lesbian, Straight Education Network (GLSEN) and Parent, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG).

It was the Boston affiliate of GLSEN which co-sponsored a conference in 2000 which gave explicit homosexual sex lessons to children as young as 14 and tried to keep parents from reaching parents. The disgusting event was taxpayer funded by the Massachusetts Department of Education. Lecturers explained to attendees various homosexual sexual acts, including “fisting” which is so vile that my conscience will not allow me to describe it here. It was thought that GLSEN only had chapters in a handful of Missouri public schools, but the fact that at least 24 are participating in the “Day of Silence” observance suggest the number is significantly larger and growing.

PFLAG may be growing in Missouri as well. This organization has been at the forefront of attempts to get pro-homosexual books into classrooms and libraries. The books promoted homosexuality as an acceptable lifestyle and offer positive portrayals of homosexual sex between boys, pornography use, cheating on a spouse with a homosexual lover and homosexual sex between underage youth and parents. They also support transsexuals, some of which have sex change operations while others maintain their God-given gender but “cross-dress.” Such gender-bending is in Missouri schools. In Missouri recently the Francis Howell Board of Education rejected complains from parents when the cross-dressing parent of a fourth-grade student chaperoned school field trips.

This assault of public schools is part of a massive overall plan to normalize homosexuality throughout American society. In 1972, the Gay Rights Platform, meeting in Chicago, demanded taxpayer dollars go toward funding sex education courses taught by homosexuals. In their 1993 March on Washington, D.C., homosexual activists called for such sex education to take place on “all levels of education.”

According to American Family Association, here are the Missouri schools that are apparently participating in a “Day of Silence:” Clayton High School, Crossroads High, Hickman High, Hillcrest High, Jefferson City High, John Burroughs School, Kirkwood Senior High, Ladue Horton Watkins High, Liberty High, Liberty Senior High, McCluer North High, Nerinx Hall High, Pattonville Senior High, Raymore-Peculiar Senior High, Raytown Senior High, Rock Bridge Senior High, The Pembroke Hill School, Van Horn High, Webster Groves High, Winnetonka High, and William Chrisman High.

This article is reprinted from the March 25, 2008, issue of The Pathway, the newspaper of the Missouri Baptist Convention.

Further Learning

Learn more about: Family, Addictions, Substance Abuse, Children, Education, Sexual Purity, Homosexuality,

1 Comments

1 On Apr 10, 2008, at 9:56pm, Dan Valdes wrote:

Mr Hinkle says about the day of silence

...“Homosexual activists will tell us it is to remember homosexuals who have been murdered allegedly because of their lifestyle, but the reality is something else. It is part of a national strategy to gain widespread acceptance of their lifestyle—especially in our public school system.”

We already enjoy widespread acceptance in society and are making strong gains in the pubic policy arena, so perhaps the schools signed on board willingly and gladly because they understand the true meaning behind the observance is about tolerance, acceptance and love over violence and hatred towards gays. 

Love is a Christian virtue so I wonder why Mr. Hinkle isn’t focused on that in this essay?  What does he have against gay people expressing their desire to not be beaten up by bullies and thugs?  Why do the Baptists continually lean on the side of marginalizing gay people and treating us like a persona non grata?

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