Immigration reform: It’s not about politics

By Barrett Duke
Nov 20, 2012

Political pundits across the country are talking about the role the Latino vote played in the presidential election. Latinos clearly favored president Obama over governor Romney. The positions taken by each candidate on immigration reform was clearly a factor for many Latinos.

Listen to the audio of this commentary here.

Many of these political pundits are calling on Republicans to change their position toward illegal immigrants to help with Republican politics. No doubt, a more realistic approach would help.

But immigration reform should not be about politics. It should be about human dignity. The Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission supports immigration reform because we believe God expects this nation to act in a compassionate manner toward those who are living peacefully among us, whether they are here legally or not.

We gain this perspective from the Bible. When God was telling His people Israel how to deal with the immigrant in their midst, He said, “You shall love him as yourself” (Lev. 19:34). If God could instruct His people to love the immigrant among them who did not even necessarily share the faith of His people, surely He expects the same from us.

For thirty years our nation literally looked the other way while millions of Hispanics crossed our southern border and millions of other people from around the world overstayed their visas. While jobs were plentiful, the government was happy to have them helping keep our economic engine humming. In response to our passive attitude, they made lives here. But now, these Hispanics, Asians, Africans, and others who have spent decades here making a life for themselves and raising their children in our midst find themselves threatened with deportation, either by force or starvation.

Those of us who are offended that these men and women willingly broke our laws and continue to do so with false identity documents are right to be offended. There must be a penalty for this. But for those of us who call ourselves Christians our reaction to them should first be one of compassion not retribution.

These men and women are loved by God as much as we. They also are created in the image of God. They are also people for whom Jesus died. They deserve better than what some among us are attempting. For many the skills they apply here are not even useful in the homelands they left years ago. To drive them out is certain to consign them to lives of abject poverty. This is not a Christian response to people in need.

The Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission supports an immigration reform plan that secures our borders once and for all, ensures workplace enforcement, and provides paths to legal status and/or citizenship with appropriate restitution and requirements for those without a criminal history. Such a plan demonstrates our nation’s commitment to the rule of law and also our commitment to welcoming the immigrant.

Listen to the audio of this commentary here.

Dr. Barrett Duke is Vice President for Public Policy and Research for the Southern Baptist Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, and also serves as Director of the Commission’s Research Institute of the ERLC. Read more of his work here. He is also a regular contributor to the For Faith and Family radio broadcast.

Further Learning

Learn more about: Citizenship, Immigration,

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Dec 18, 2013

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Elizabeth Bristow, 615-782-8409
or Dan Darling, 615-782-8413
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

NASHVILLE, Tenn.—During a recent interview on CNN’s Erin Burnett OutFront, Russell D. Moore, addressed the criticism that Phil Robertson, star of A&E’s Duck Dynasty, is receiving for his comments on homosexuality in a recent article for GQ magazine.

“Suggesting that people who hold to what every branch of the Christian faith has held to for 2,000 years is somehow bigoted or hateful is not productive for speech,” said Moore, president of the Southern Baptist Convention’s Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission, on CNN.

In response to the controversy, A&E announced that it has put Robertson “on hiatus,” an action that Russell D. Moore calls “ridiculous.”

“Silencing views one doesn’t agree with, rather than engaging them, is hardly open-minded,” Moore said on Twitter tonight.

Moore expounded his position on his blog, Moore to the Point.

“Admittedly, A&E didn’t hire Robertson to be Charlie Rose or George Will. They hired him to be comedic and sometimes shockingly homespun. Now, I thought his reported anatomical comparisons were ill-advised and crude. But that doesn’t seem to be where the controversy lies.

“The comments that seem most offensive to people are his moral assessments of sex outside of conjugal marriage, which were more or less just a recitation of the Apostle Paul’s words in 1 Corinthians 6. As Christians, we believe that Jesus is lord over sexuality, and he says that sexuality is expressed rightly only in the marriage of a man and a woman. That’s not new. We also think we’re all sinners, and that God calls us all to repentance. That’s not new either.

“We’re a divided country on sexual issues. That’s why every news cycle brings more controversy. Why not engage one another, and have the debates in a civil fashion, without attempting to silence one another. I don’t agree with David Letterman’s views on divorce and cohabitation, but I don’t want him suspended for voicing them. I’ll bet I don’t agree with MTV’s Nev Schulman of the popular Catfish show on sexual ethics, but it wouldn’t put me in the fetal position under the table to hear him voice them.

“Let’s have the sort of cultural conversation that allows us to seek to persuade each other, not to seek to silence one another with intimidation. That’s what real diversity is all about.”

The full text of Moore’s blog can be found at russellmoore.com.

The Southern Baptist Convention is America’s largest non-Catholic denomination with more than 15.8 million members in over 46,000 churches nationwide. The Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission is the SBC’s ethics, religious liberty and public policy agency with offices in Nashville, Tenn. and Washington, D.C.

- END

To request an interview with Russell D. Moore
contact Elizabeth Bristow at (615) 782-8409
or Daniel Darling at (615) 782-8413,
or by e-mail at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).
Visit our Web site at http://www.erlc.com.
Follow us on Twitter at @ERLCPressRoom.

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