The Bible Speaks on Alcohol

By Staff
Jan 24, 2006

People have been drinking fermented beverages since at least the days of Noah. The Bible states that after the flood, Noah planted a vineyard, made wine, and got drunk (Genesis 9:20-21). In New Testament times, Jesus turned water into wine at the marriage feast at Cana (John 2:1-11), and Paul admonished Timothy to “use a little wine because of your stomach and your frequent illnesses” (1 Timothy 5:23). After the introduction of distilled spirits with their much higher alcohol content (up to eight times higher than wine) in the Middle Ages, the problems caused by alcohol increased significantly. Today, alcohol abuse has caused catastrophic problems and brought suffering to millions of people worldwide. Because the use and abuse of alcohol continues to plague our world, the Bible’s teachings on the subject are as relevant today as they have ever been. The following Bible passages speak clearly on some important matters related to alcohol.

The Bible Identifies Total Abstinence from Alcohol As an Expression of Devotion to God.

  • The Nazirite vow included abstinence from alcohol.

    “The Lord instructed Moses: ‘…When a man or woman makes a special vow, a Nazirite vow, to consecrate himself to the Lord, he is to abstain from wine and beer… He is not to eat anything produced by the grapevine, from seeds to skin, during his vow’” (Numbers 6:1-4).

  • Daniel made a personal choice to abstain from drinking alcohol.

    “Daniel determined that he would not defile himself with the king’s food or with the wine he drank. So he asked permission from the chief official not to defile himself” (Daniel 1:8).

  • John the Baptist abstained from drinking alcohol.

    “But the angel said to him: Do not be afraid, Zechariah, because your prayer has been heard. Your wife Elizabeth will bear you a son, and you will name him John.
    There will be joy and delight for you, and many will rejoice at his birth.
    For he will be great in the sight of the Lord and will never drink wine or beer. He will be filled with the Holy Spirit while still in his mother’s womb” (Luke 1:13-15).


The Bible Recognizes the Dangers of Alcohol.

“Wine is a mocker, beer is a brawler, and whoever staggers because of them is not wise” (Proverbs 20:1).

“Listen, my son, and be wise; keep your mind on the right course. Don’t associate with those who drink too much wine” (Proverbs 23:19-20).

“Who has woe? Who has sorrow? Who has conflicts? Who has complaints? Who has wounds for no reason? Who has red eyes? Those who linger over wine, those who go looking for mixed wine. Don’t gaze at wine when it is red, when it gleams in the cup and goes down smoothly. In the end it bites like a snake and stings like a viper. Your eyes will see strange things, and you will say absurd things” (Proverbs 23:29-33).

“These also stagger because of wine and stumble under the influence of beer: priest and prophet stagger because of beer, they are confused by wine. They stumble because of beer, they are muddled in [their] visions, they stumble in [their] judgments” (Isaiah 28:7).

The Bible Condemns Drunkenness.

“For the drunkard and the glutton will become poor, and grogginess will clothe [them] in rags” (Proverbs 23:21).

“Let us walk with decency, as in the daylight: not in carousing and drunkenness…” (Romans 13:13).

“Do not be deceived: no sexually immoral people, idolaters… [nor] drunkards… will inherit God’s kingdom” (1 Corinthians 6:9-10).

“Now the works of the flesh are obvious: sexual immorality, moral impurity, promiscuity, idolatry, sorcery, hatreds, strife, jealousy, outbursts of anger, selfish ambitions, dissensions, factions, envy, drunkenness, carousing, and anything similar, about which I tell you in advance—as I told you before—that those who practice such things will not inherit the kingdom of God” (Galatians 5:19-21).

“An overseer, therefore, must… not [be] addicted to wine” (1 Timothy 3:2-3; see also Titus 1:7).

“Deacons, likewise, should… not [be] drinking a lot of wine” (1 Timothy 3:8).

“And don’t get drunk with wine, which [leads to] reckless actions, but be filled with the Spirit” (Ephesians 5:18).

The Bible Provides Important Spiritual Reasons for Not Drinking Alcoholic Beverages.


  • Care of the body is important for Christians because the Holy Spirit indwells them.

    “Therefore, brothers, by the mercies of God, I urge you to present your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and pleasing to God; this is your spiritual worship.
    Do not be conformed to this age, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind, so that you may discern what is the good, pleasing, and perfect will of God” (Romans 12:1-2).

    “Do you not know that your body is a sanctuary of the Holy Spirit…” (1 Corinthians 6:19).

    “For we are the sanctuary of the living God… Therefore, come out from among them and be separate, says the Lord; do not touch any unclean thing, and I will welcome you. I will be a Father to you, and you will be sons and daughters to Me, says the Lord Almighty. Therefore dear friends, since we have such promises, we should wash ourselves clean from every impurity of the flesh and spirit, making our sanctification complete in the fear of God” (2 Corinthians 6:16-7:1).

  • A Christian’s life should not be an impediment to others.

    “Therefore, let us decide… not to… put a stumbling block or pitfall in your brother’s way… It is a noble thing not to eat meat, or drink wine, or do anything that makes your brother stumble” (Romans 14:13, 21).

    “But be careful that this right of yours in no way becomes a stumbling block to the weak” (1 Corinthians 8:9).

  • Christians should always be in control of their minds and actions.

    “So then, we must not sleep, like the rest, but we must stay awake and be sober” (1 Thessalonians 5:6).

    “Therefore, get your minds ready for action, being self-disciplined…” (1 Peter 1:13).

    “…be clear-headed…” (1 Peter 4:7).

    “Be sober! Be on the alert! Your adversary the Devil is prowling around like a roaring lion, looking for anyone he can devour” (1 Peter 5:8).


Conclusion

Alcohol is treated in the Bible somewhat like slavery and polygamy, which, though not universally condemned, were undermined and ultimately doomed by the high moral principles set forth in the Scriptures. Similarly, while total abstinence from wine with its relatively low alcohol content was not demanded in Bible times, both general Bible principles and specific Bible teachings encourage today’s Christians to abstain from this dangerous drug. In place of a life controlled by the mind-numbing, destructive influence of alcohol, the Bible presents the model of a lifestyle characterized by inner peace, joy, and love through the Holy Spirit. Additionally, the Bible encourages Christians, as salt and light (Matthew 5:13-16), to deliver society from alcohol’s devastating personal and social effects.

All Scripture is from the Holman Christian Standard Bible.

Further Learning

Learn more about: Family, Addictions, Substance Abuse, Living, Health, Citizenship, Social Issues,

38 Comments

1 On Jun 26, 2006, at 2:17pm, Darren wrote:

I don’t think that drinking wine or beer in itself is a bad thing.  Wine is not evil, beer isn’t evil what we do with them can be though, its like to start a fire isn’t a sin but to burn someones house down with it is, it all depends on how you use it. If someone were to drink a glass or two with a meal or somthing of that nature it isn’t a sin, but all to often people can’t control it and get drunk and this is a sin. I would have to say if you can’t control it don’t do it, only you and God knows if you can or cannot control it. Mainly its not that important to lose family or children or kill someone over, so for everyone’s sake if you can’t limit yourself and control it JUST DON’T DO IT!!!!

2 On Jun 28, 2006, at 3:13pm, Connie Rhyne wrote:

Thank you SBC for taking a stand on Alcolol in America and passing Resolution 5. My sister and her husband were killed and her son seriously injured by a drunk driver. They weren’t alcoholics, just two young men out to have fun. Their fun had a high cost! Two boys lost their mom and dad,their lives were forever changed, and they came to live with us. Everyone when they start drinking think they can control it. My brother was an alcoholic but said he could stop anytime he wanted to,he later died in a drunken stupor after failling down his basement steps. Why take the first drink? Why give the enemy an opportunity? Why give that appearance of evil and destroy your testimony? Many young innocent eyes and babes in Christ are watching you.

3 On Jul 4, 2006, at 3:55pm, Scott wrote:

I totally agree with the first reply, this tract was way too one-sided. Wine and other alcoholic beverages should not be condemned, and self-control (a fruit of the Spirt) should have its own tract and be taught more in churches.

4 On Jul 7, 2006, at 6:44pm, Scott wrote:

It just seems that with this tract, the SBC is heading down the road of legalism. According to this decision, Timothy wouldn’t be able to hold a position in the SBC because Paul recommended him to drink a little wine for his stomach’s sake.

5 On Jul 10, 2006, at 2:26pm, Lindy wrote:

CAN a person take a drink of alcohol and not sin?  Yes.  But in my opinion, this tract is NOT too one-sided.  The intent is to show the dangers of alcohol.  It met this goal well.  The problem, as I see it, is this:  People who regularly drink alcohol as a lifesyle choice too often “fall off the wagon.”  (I did not say everyone who drinks a glass of wine falls off the wagon—but there are dangerous tendencies for those who regularly drink to have problems related to alchohol.)  The influence of others can also be problematic.  One of the reasons I don’t drink is because I have two teenage sons.  If I drink alcohol, they will, too.  While I may have the maturity to “drink responsibly,” they may not.  I love them too much to risk it.  Finally, my perspective is this:  If your ultimate goal is to glorify God, all things considered, the best choice may be not to drink alcohol.  Permissible?  Yes.  But is it the BEST choice?  For me, the answer is no.

6 On Jul 10, 2006, at 3:28pm, Randy Bell wrote:

Holiness Explained From the Old Testament Standards

Do not drink wine nor strong drink, thou, nor thy sons with thee, when ye go into the tabernacle of the congregation, lest ye die: it shall be a statute for ever throughout your generations: And that ye may put difference between holy and unholy, and between unclean and clean; And that ye may teach the children of Israel all the statutes which the LORD hath spoken unto them by the hand of Moses. (Lev 10:9-11 KJV)

No Drinking at the Temple or Tabernacle

God is a holy God and that means absolutely unique and separate from anyone else in purity, goodness, and power. Because He is our creator His will and standards are truth and reality for all people, in all places, and for all times.
To read the rest, post only allows 1000 words…

http://delriocommunitychurch.org/faq-30.htm

7 On Jul 10, 2006, at 3:53pm, Daryl wrote:

I wonder if those who are so open to drinking alcohol have ever had to sit with a four year old child to tell them daddy would not be coming home that night because he had been killed by a drunk driver or deal with a family whose lives had been destroyed because dad or mom took a couple of drinks or prayed for the physical healing of a mother because she had been beaten by a husband who was a social drinker.  As a Pastor, I have and is why I appreciate this stance on alcohol.

8 On Jul 11, 2006, at 2:56pm, Jack wrote:

The only full proof method of not becoming addicted to alcohol is to not take the first drink. For those that take the moderation side whose to say that just because you can stop at one or two glasses of wine your children will be able to? Moderation has its problems such as the main scriptural argumment and that it is a stumbling block to new belivers.Fermented Wine never touched Jesus lips and when Jesus was present it was always refered to as Fruit of the Vine. He could have never touched alcoholic wine because he was the sinless son of God and King’s and Priest were forbidden from it.(Proverbs 31:4-5) We are to pattern our life after God’s son and that would mean we are to be Alcohol Free as He was. Abstinence is not legalism it is love. I praise God for SBC leadership and messengers taking a stand on this important issue that is wrecking our families today even many in our churches.

9 On Jul 11, 2006, at 4:14pm, Steve Lynch wrote:

It’s not that we are dismissing the negative effects of drunkeness, it’s absolutely UNSCRIPTURAL to ban the consumption of all alcohol.

  Timothy’s situation has already been mentioned.  Perhaps Montezuma’s Revenge kept him from drinking the local water.  Wine is not a banned substance in the scripture, its a controlled substance.

  Jesus took a Nazarite vow before the crucifixion BUT he will drink wine when the Kingdom of God comes.

  Plus the tract is in violation of Colossians 2:16  
Let no man therefore judge you in meat, or in drink, or in respect of an holyday, or of the new moon, or of the sabbath [days]:—KJV (I’m LESS than impressed with the Holman)

To those who want to say that they deal with the effects of drunkeness with people in their ministry…wellll welcome to Ministry.  You deal with liars, gossipers, sneakin Deacons and tricky Trustees too.  Banning a thing is not the answer.  Ministering to their hearts IS.

10 On Jul 11, 2006, at 4:42pm, Pastor Scott Longwell wrote:

Why just focus on alcohol. If our bodies are “temples of the Holy Spirit,” then why do we have so many overweight and obese pastors. I would like to see the SBC pass a resolution on obese pastors and their obese wives. Sorry, but the truth hurts. If we are going to use these verses for abstaining from alcohol or being a stumbling block to others, maybe we should first look in the mirror and realize the truth: “The fat pastor never preaches on gluttony!” Our problem is not and has never been pastors who drink too much or church members who drink to much, it is pastors and church members who are overweight and obese from eating too much. We should focus on the real problem. It isn’t alcohol abuse, it is food abuse and temple abuse!

11 On Jul 16, 2006, at 3:02am, Eric Gutierrez wrote:

I could not agree more with Pastor Scott Longwell. Gluttony, habitual _______ to an excess, whatever it may be, is a problem facing just about everyone in our churches today.  Fill in the blank with sports, alchol, eating, sex, and even voluteering too much at church and you have one of the biggest problems facing Christianity today.  It is called self-control.  Proper control of self is something very lacking in our society today.  America, is especially a society of excess.  If a person is in a Christ centered life and has control of self, then you can fill in that blank above with the examples I mentioned and never cause a mature fellow Christian to stumble and “Life Will Be Good”.

12 On Aug 13, 2006, at 10:22pm, Scott Granger wrote:

Some representative verses are in order -

1Ti 5:23 (No longer drink only water, but use a little wine for the sake of your stomach and your frequent ailments.)

-//-

1Ti 3:8 Deacons likewise must be dignified, not double-tongued, *not “addicted” to much wine*, not greedy for dishonest gain.

13 On Aug 13, 2006, at 10:30pm, Scott Granger wrote:

Pro 20:1 Wine is a mocker, strong drink a brawler, and *whoever is “led astray” by it is not wise*.

-//-

Deu 14:24-26 And if the way is too long for you, so that you are not able to carry the tithe, when the LORD your God blesses you, because the place is too far from you, which the LORD your God chooses, to set his name there, then you shall turn it into money and bind up the money in your hand and go to the place that the LORD your God chooses and *spend the money for whatever you desire—oxen or sheep “or wine or strong drink”, whatever your appetite craves*. And you shall eat there before the LORD your God and rejoice, you and your household.

14 On Aug 13, 2006, at 10:52pm, Scott Granger wrote:

Here is another verse for consideration:

Deu 14:24-26 And if the way is too long for you, so that you are not able to carry the tithe, when the LORD your God blesses you, because the place is too far from you, which the LORD your God chooses, to set his name there, then you shall turn it into money and bind up the money in your hand and go to the place that the LORD your God chooses and *spend the money for whatever you desire—oxen or sheep “or wine or strong drink”, whatever your appetite craves*. And you shall eat there before the LORD your God and rejoice, you and your household.

15 On Jan 9, 2007, at 11:17pm, chris wrote:

I think it is also important to remember that Jesus himself turned water in to wine for people to enjoy at the wedding at Cana (John 1:2-11). So if God really didn’t want us drinking wine any alcoholic beverage, Jesus would not have done that. He could just have just as easily let the people be happy with water or turned the water into orange juice or something. Drunkenness is the sin! And the bible warns against it and condemns it explicitly. Also see Deuteronomy 14:26 - “And thou shalt bestow that money for whatsoever thy soul lusteth after, for oxen, or for sheep, or for wine, or for strong drink, or for whatsoever thy soul desireth: and thou shalt eat there before the LORD thy God, and thou shalt rejoice, thou, and thine household,”

16 On Jul 20, 2007, at 10:24pm, Joy Kelso wrote:

I was brought up in Baptist churches and have always been taught that alcohol is wrong. Just because it is 2007 doesn’t make it right. I have seen first hand the misery and suffering brought by this drug and it is NOT a blessing or encouragement to anyone. My husband just resigned a church in whom the leadership and members see nothing wrong with drinking. What kind of example are we setting for our children and if we are like the lost world, no wonder unsaved people see no need for what we have.

17 On Aug 28, 2007, at 3:58pm, Randy wrote:

I am not a Southern Baptist and have never been a drinker of alcohol.  I agree with several here that point out that the sin is “drunkenness”.

One thing I have never been able to comprehend is what reason anyone would have for drinking alcohol besides altering their state of mind?  Alcohol has no nutritional value and can actually aggravate some medical conditions.  The only purpose I can see for drinking alcohol is to use a drug to artificially change your mood and demeanor.  Perhaps this is the reason the verse about being filled with the Spirit instead of relying on alcohol is in the Bible.

18 On Aug 28, 2007, at 10:07pm, christian wrote:

Just in response to the above comment - cookies, cakes and other “junk food” have no nutritional value either but people just consume them because they taste good. And I think it is the same with wine. As others have wrote here, the sin IS drunkenness. Jesus would not have turned water into wine if he had a problem with us drinking it. As with many other things in this world, the abuse of some things have their consequences.

19 On Sep 18, 2007, at 1:55am, Mike wrote:

I am happy to see that views on both side of this issue are being shared. Jesus turned water to wine and used wine at the Last Supper a.k.a. Passover. It is not what goes into a man that makes him evil but what comes out. Drunkeness is clearly a sin.

20 On Sep 29, 2007, at 10:44am, NMC wrote:

Mike is absolutely correct- it is not the drink, but the immoderate drinker, that is in sin.

This article states that “Alcohol is treated in the Bible somewhat like slavery and polygamy, which, though not universally condemned, were undermined and ultimately doomed by the high moral principles set forth in the Scriptures”. This is incredibly and completely wrong. The major problem with this statement is that neither slavery nor polygamy is treated as a blessing from God, whereas alcohol is (see Psalms 104:15, or Jesus’ miracle at Canan).

It’s unfortunately typical to see that most of the posts here that are completely and entirely opposed to alcohol use vague statements along the lines of “drinking can’t be good” and “what kind of example are we setting for our children?”, whereas those supporting the moderate use of the blessing of wine actually have at least some sort of scriptural basis to their arguments. This seems all too typical for this debate.

21 On Sep 29, 2007, at 10:58am, NMC wrote:

As the Bible suggests, we as Christians generally do far more good by encouraging responsibility and moderation than fleeing from something’s use or practice altogether. As many often say regarding the Christian lifestyle- “everything in moderation”. Our society might have become more gluttonous in the last 100 years, but that doesn’t mean we should stop eating all “junk food”. It’s no different with alcohol. The best lesson we can teach to our children, and society in general, is to use God’s gift as He intended. Blanket abstentionism, and especially prohibition, on the other hand, is a man-made and anti-biblical concept that has arguably created more problems than it has solved.

22 On Sep 29, 2007, at 11:10am, NMC wrote:

Daryl asks: ‘I wonder if those who are so open to drinking alcohol have ever had to sit with a four year old child to tell them daddy would not be coming home that night…”

As if what, Daryl? Those of us who are “open to drinking” could care less about these people? What about those who have had to sit with family members of those killed by guns? Should we therefore believe that guns should be forbidden from those who want to use them responsibly? And why aren’t you in the business of forbidding the use of cars by Christians, considering that people you know have in fact been killed in car accidents?

The point ist that alcohol, like most other things God provides to us, is a blessing from God. The Bible makes that more than clear. And denying a blessing from God, whatever the reason, is not doing God’s work. In fact, it’s doing quite the opposite.

Face it- your reasoning for opposing the Bible’s true stance on alcohol is a worldy one.

23 On Oct 24, 2007, at 4:33am, JSC wrote:

You could think of it this way.  God put it here as a test.  We can choose to use it or not.
If we decide to use it, we control our actions and do not become drunk.  It is also the law(0% tolerance where I am) that you can not drink/or have in your system, alcohol, when operating machinery.  The law was put in place because of the people that abuse it, and hurt others.  It is neither a worldy view or a Holy view, rather a test God put in place.  The Bible just outlines and states what will likely(or will, scripturally) happen by the use of it.
Its a test of abuse and who can keep their cool.

24 On Apr 9, 2008, at 5:23am, Skyler Bunce wrote:

I agree with the post number 1, I do not think that drinking is a sin.

25 On Aug 20, 2008, at 6:05pm, John wrote:

Just another example of more legalism from the SBC. Always focusing on rules instead of the heart.  I really believe that the SBC is the modern version of the Pharisees.  I once was one of those SBC attendees and believed everything about all the rules that the pastor preached about…Then I read the Bible and found out about our responsible freedom in Christ!  I promptly left the SBC and am never looking back!  What a relief that I can actually have fun, grow in Christ, and not worry about my brother always looking down on me for stupid issues like have a glass of wine at dinner with my wife. 

Keep it up SBC and you will no longer have anyone to dictate legalism too!

26 On Aug 24, 2008, at 1:03am, nicole Williams wrote:

Drinking of wine is as much a sin as having sex out of marriage.  I strongly believe if drunk within moderation, and to an acceptable level there is no sin.  Would God really punish us for drinking wine?  I believe the answer is no.  If an individual knows that drinking will have a negative effect on their physical or mental comdition (get drunk), they should be mature enough to abstain.  Diabetics cannot use sugar, but the use of sugar is not a sin.  It is not what we do but how adn why we do thing thath makes it wrong or sinful.

27 On Aug 27, 2008, at 8:24am, Donna wrote:

I ,also, look at this from both sides. I agree the Bible (God’s word) does not say that it is wrong to drink a glass of wine. But I, also, see where some that are not a child of God’s, that you may have been witnessing to sees you drinking that glass of wine and does not know what the bible says about it. You have possibly lost what seed you have sown and I personally would not want to stand before God on that matter. Plus if you are a mentor to a new believer and he has yet to know God’s word, it could be possible to make that person stumble in anything we do. Whether it is our words, our actions of any kinds. It is about walking in the spirit of God. The way wine/alcohol is viewed by the world today, it can also be looked at as being part of the world. So you have so many ways to look at it.Continued

28 On Aug 27, 2008, at 8:30am, Donna wrote:

I personally say that I agree with the SBC, we as god’s children should be set apart from the world’s views. Just like I have said to many lately, I am not a christian because the word christian is associated anyone that attends church on Sunday that says I am a Christian but do not walk in God’s way or know him intimately. I am a Child of Gods. So way to stand up for God on this issue and not be part of today’s world views.

29 On Sep 10, 2008, at 1:05am, JSC wrote:

Its not really who is right or who is wrong.  It was put here as a test, just like we were put here for testing by God.  It is a personal choice as long as we do not abuse it and respect it.  If we so choose not to respect it, the choices will effect the consequences in the future.

30 On Oct 6, 2008, at 2:39am, Timada wrote:

Bible doesn’t talk only about abstaining from alcohol, but what a big sin is to make abuse of it. I am not talking about getting drunk, even if this is a form of abusing alcohol, but I am thinking of those alcoholics who can’t leave a day without some grades in their veins. If today’s people would me more religious, maybe we wouldn’t need anymore all these drug rehab - http://i4you.wordpress.com/2008/08/27/drug-rehab-alcohol-rehabilitation-center/ - clinics that we keep building.

31 On Oct 13, 2008, at 4:57am, Ada wrote:

I agree that alcohol has become an evil that corrupts people and puts people in danger. I have nothing against wine but beer and spirits have led to a generation of binge drinkers who seem to only live so they can drink again and intoxicate their body to no end. Alcohol also makes people delinquent and detached from the teachings of God and respecting/experiencing the many wondrous things in life. Ultimately alcohol is a killer, causing many deaths and suffering in many different ways, yet it is allowed to thrive unchallenged, and by most people who take it never seen as something bad. I respect the church when it makes a stand against it. I was once admitted to an alcohol treatment rehab ( http://www.casapalmera.com ) but a preacher visited one day and reminded me about the word of God which has helped me understand all of this.

32 On Oct 17, 2008, at 1:45am, Sandra wrote:

Alot of interesting posts here.  I have been contemplating for some time whether it is right or wrong for Christians to engage in “controlled” drinking. My mother took her first sip when she was 14, it has taken control of her life for 30+ years now.  My dad used to be a social drinker for many years, a couple of beers once in a blue moon (in control).  Today, he now has a regular appointment with the bottle when he finishes work.  The biggest question I ask myself is that if beer or wine are fine as long as you are in control, how come some people take the first sip and lose control?  Does it really make sense that the Lord would approve such a drink knowing that there’s a chance lives would be wrecked by it?  Does the Lord endorse a drink that some can handle and others can’t handle?  Some take that first sip and have no idea what they are in for; that’s precisely what happened with my mom.

33 On Oct 18, 2008, at 7:56pm, NMC wrote:

“I agree that alcohol has become an evil that corrupts people and puts people in danger. I have nothing against wine but beer and spirits have led to a generation of binge drinkers who seem to only live so they can drink again and intoxicate their body to no end.”

Interesting perspective. I think I would agree with this assessment.

34 On Oct 20, 2008, at 1:18pm, Echo chris wrote:

I have been well inform that my body is meant for holy spirit according to you writings but according to my own assessment after   reading the quoted scriptures ,I have found out that it is not the alcohol that is a problem according to the bible but the way we use it that make ti a problem.the bible mainly do criticize drunkards but not alcohol so I need more clarification on this issue

35 On Nov 17, 2008, at 9:54am, brian2008 wrote:

There are allowances for the consumption of alcohol, the Bible speaks strongly and extensively against drunkenness.
=================================
brian
<a >mississippi drug rehab</a>

36 On Feb 27, 2009, at 7:15pm, Earlene Custis wrote:

Everyone can keep making excuses to drink if they want.  I used to drink and then GOD convicted my heart. A good warm cup of coffee is relaxing too.  Quit making excuses to do what you want to do.  The bible tells you and you ignore it, because your fleshy side does not want to give it up.  Its just like everything else in this world.  Dressing slutty and getting pregnant.  Telling dirty jokes that degrade.  Cussing.  They are all wrong and we need to grow up and give our whole lives to Christ so he can convict us and quit making excuses and changing the Bible to suit ourselves.  Im not perfect, but the difference is I know right from wrong and I will not make excuses for my self to sin.  I do sin every day.  We all do, but I will not excuse myself from the blessing that I will lose because of these sins.  God forgive us for we know not what we do?  Can you truly say that?

37 On Mar 4, 2009, at 9:42am, ECHO CHRIS wrote:

Noah planted a vineyard, made wine, and got drunk (Genesis 9:20-21), use a little wine because of your stomach and your frequent illnesses” (1 Timothy 5:23),The Lord instructed Moses: ‘…When a man or woman makes a special vow, a Nazirite vow, to consecrate himself to the Lord, he is to abstain from wine and beer… He is not to eat anything produced by the grapevine, from seeds to skin, during his vow’”(Numbers 6:1-4).
All this and others such as choice made by Daniel are very interesting quotation in the bible but for sue it is had to believe that alcohol in bad since even instruction was given to people like timothy to take to help in their digestion, Noah even made wine and you not suppose to take when you are in the NAZIRITE vow but not after the vow.
I still believe that drunkardness is bad just because of the way it makes you behave

38 On Apr 6, 2009, at 12:32am, Nancy wrote:

My 26 year old niece says she uses moderate drinking as a witnessing tool!  In a sense showing unbelievers that you can accept Christ and still drink…in essence still be cool even though you are a christian.  Its funny to me because most people that I know that accepted Christ wanted to leave their former way of life.  The number one reason the world wants nothing to do with christianity is hypocrisy…going to church on Sunday and living like the world the other 6 days of the week.  What does it mean when Jesus says, “Be holy, as I holy”?  What does it mean to be “sanctified or set apart”...in what ways?  What does it mean not to be “conformed to the world”? My kids are now 23 and 21.  My husband’s boss recently said that we should write a book about raising kids.  Instead he responded that we didn’t need to write one…we just read one…The Bible. Thankfully our now grown children know what it means to not be conformed to the world.

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By Evan Lenow - Jan 6, 2014 - (1)

The Pew Research Center has released results of a study on views of end of life medical treatment. Among the findings is how different faith groups view the morality of ending life.

A fourth of evangelicals believe a person has a moral right to suicide if he or she "is ready to die, living is now a burden" (25 percent) or if that person "is an extremely heavy burden on family" (24 percent).…

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U.S. House OKs religious liberty envoy

By Tom Strode - Sep 20, 2013

The U.S. House of Representatives has overwhelmingly approved a bill requiring appointment of a special envoy for the promotion of religious liberty in such countries as Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Pakistan and Syria.…

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ERLC Receives Accreditation from ECFA

Feb 10, 2014

NASHVILLE, Tenn., Feb. 10, 2014—The Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention received accreditation from the Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability (ECFA).…

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The Bible Speaks on Race Senate defeats filibuster attempt, 72-25, setting up Tuesday confirmation vote