Article Feb 24, 2017

Ethics and culture reads for 2017: Eight books on ethics and the Christian life

Note: This is the final post in a 3-part series. If you missed it, check out the first and second posts as well.

There’s no shortage of good books coming out this year. For those of you who love to read—or want to grow in that desire—here are some of the most anticipated books of 2017 on ethics and the Christian life that you should consider adding to your reading list.

Wendy Alsup, Is the Bible Good for Women?: Seeking Clarity and Confidence Through a Jesus-Centered Understanding of Scripture (March, Multnomah).

The book: A deep look into the Bible’s teaching about the value, dignity and equality of women.

Why this book?: As the culture is experiencing a sexual revolution, it’s even more important to understand and affirm biblical teaching on sex and gender.

Erik Raymond, Chasing Contentment: Trusting God in a Discontented Age (March, Crossway).

The book: Pursuing contentment through the power of the Holy Spirit.

Why this book?: The culture tells us to base our contentment upon our circumstances (Do I have enough, make enough, know enough?). Raymond helps us embrace the source of true contentment.

Marshall Segal, Not Yet Married: The Pursuit of Joy in Singleness and Dating (June, Crossway).

The book: Segal maps the pursuit of joy for single adults.

Why this book?: More and more Americans are spending early adulthood as single people. Segal exhorts his readers to their singleness as a unique opportunity to serve God and others.

Lydia Brownback, Finding God in My Loneliness (February, Crossway).

The book: Loneliness is a significant problem, even in an age of hyperconnectivity.

Why this book?: Brownback writes to encourage women to see their union with Christ as the only true remedy for loneliness.

Jaquelle Crowe, This Changes Everything: How the Gospel Transforms the Teen Years (April, Crossway).

The book: A brief work written by a teenager for teenagers.

Why this book?: Crowe offers her fellow a teens a practical and theological exhortation to resist the temptations of young adulthood and allow the gospel to transform their lives.

Kelly Kapic, Embodied Hope: A Theological Meditation on Pain and Suffering (June, IVP Academic).

The book: A call to see Christ as the only hope in the midst of suffering.

Why this book?: Christians are often at a loss to comfort those who are experiencing deep pain or tragedy. In this book, Kapic does not deny the very real pain we often face, but encourages us to look to Jesus as “embodied hope.”

Sarah Walton and Kristen Wetherell, Hope When It Hurts: Biblical Reflections to Help You Grasp God's Purpose in Your Suffering (April, The Good Book Company).

The book: 30 theological reflections for women on facing pain and suffering.

Why this book?: The authors write to offer biblical encouragement to women facing physical, emotional and psychological pain. The book includes the reflections, questions, prayers, and room to journal through each one.

Russ Ramsey, Struck: One Christian's Reflections on Encountering Death (March, IVP Books).

The book: Real reflections on coming face to face with your own mortality.

Why this book?: Death is one of the only certain elements of life. Seeing life in light of death changes the way that we live.

Whatever your reading goals are for this year, these books should keep you busy. If you missed either of my previous posts on books to read in 2017 you can find the first post here and my second post here.