By / Jan 22

WASHINGTON (BP) – Thousands of Americans braved snowy conditions Friday (Jan. 19) in support of the pro-life cause during the 51st annual March for Life.

This year’s March for Life gathering marked the second time the event has been held since the historic overturning of the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade decision in 2022, returning abortion legislation to the states.

It was the court’s Roe decision, handed down in January 1973, which inspired the first March for Life event, held the following year in 1974.

Since that first March, pro-life Americans (including many evangelical Christians) have come together each January near the Capitol in Washington, D.C., to support the cause and re-affirm their commitment to protect unborn children and care for their mothers.

The event is understood to be the world’s largest annual human rights demonstration.

Among those marching Friday were many staff members of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission (ERLC).  

ERLC policy director Hannah Daniel advocates for pro-life causes year-round through the Leland House located on Capitol Hill.

Each year, the March for Life is an opportunity for the pro-life movement to come together and refocus our efforts on the goal: saving lives. The theme of this year’s march, ‘With every woman, for every child,’ points to the road ahead. As we continue to work towards a day where abortion is illegal, we must also come alongside women who are vulnerable with care and support, empowering them to choose life.

Hannah Daniel

For Julie Masson, ERLC director of communications, marching is a family affair.

“This is my fourth time participating in the March for Life, and each year I’m amazed at how many different people come to D.C. for this event,” Masson said.

“I’m joined this year by my teenage daughter, and it’s been wonderful to see the March through her eyes. The March for Life is another opportunity for the ERLC to communicate our commitment to advocating for the most vulnerable among us. We will continue to serve mothers and save lives through our public policy priorities.”

This year’s March for Life takes place just two days before Sanctity of Life Sunday in the Southern Baptist Convention (Jan. 21), marking the 39th year of observance of the day on the SBC Calendar.

Read the full Baptist Press article here.

By / Jan 19

Watch as Brent Leatherwood explains why the ERLC, among other Southern Baptists, gathers at the March for Life and also clarifies what it’s going to take to promote a culture of life in our country. Additionally, he shares about the Psalm 139 Project, a ministry of the ERLC that places life-saving ultrasound machines in pregnancy resource centers.

By / Jan 18

(RNS) — Last January, March for Life participants gathered for the first time after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, celebrating a long-sought victory even as they shifted their focus to the state level — the new battleground in the enduring abortion debate.

A year later, after a series of disappointments for the organization, in which more than half a dozen state ballot initiatives strengthened access to abortion, abortion opponents will gather again for the annual D.C. march, even as March for Life also plans at least 16 state-level marches this year, double that of 2023.

Brent Leatherwood, the president of the Southern Baptist Convention’s Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, said he plans to represent his organization at the national march, as has long been its tradition. In contrast to Manson’s view about abortion rights and religious freedom, he said: “You can’t have rights that are at the expense of a life, especially a defenseless innocent life.”

Leatherwood said the road ahead will be a prolonged one for those who share his opposition to abortion.

I think the recent setbacks at the state level with ballot initiatives, various proposals in legislatures, are just a reminder that this is going to be a long path that we’re walking. And even though we may get various proposals passed or policy enacted, this question is not something that can be solved purely through policy. It is still very much a heart question.

Brent Leatherwood

Read the full Religion News Service article here.

By / Jan 18

A year ago, anti-abortion activists from across the U.S. gathered for their annual March for Life with reason to celebrate: It was their first march since the Supreme Court, seven months earlier, had overturned the nationwide right to abortion.

At this year’s march, on Friday, the mood will be very different — reflecting formidable challenges that lie ahead in this election year.

The key consequence of Dobbs was to return decision-making on abortion policy to individual states. Some Democratic-governed states — such as California, New York and New Jersey — have strengthened protections for abortion access. Roughly 20 states with Republican-controlled legislatures have either banned abortion or sought to impose new restrictions.

After Dobbs, “I didn’t want anyone to get the false sense that we were at the end of our work,” said Brent Leatherwood, an abortion opponent who heads the Southern Baptist Convention’s public policy wing.

We’ve gone from a focal point at the federal level to 50 different focal points. It may be another 50 years before we truly establish a culture of life, where preborn lives are saved and mothers are supported.

Brent Leatherwood

Read the full Associated Press article here.

By / Jan 25

Last Friday, thousands of enthusiastic individuals from every corner of the pro-life movement gathered on the National Mall for the March for Life. This year was my first March, but many around me had traveled hundreds of miles each January for 50 years. This time, they gathered with a sense of victory in light of the overturning of Roe—but also with a solemn awareness that there will always be reason to keep going. 

Now that the movement’s igniting cause has been settled, many wondered if the March would continue. On Friday, the organization’s leader Jeanne Mancini asked the eager attendees, “Should we still march?” The crowd responded with cheers and excitement because most are all too aware of the work left to be done. Conversations throughout the day centered on the tragedy of increasing access to abortion pills that undermines state-level abortion bans, the newfound importance of pro-life state legislators, and ultimately, the task of affecting “hearts and minds” of our neighbors who are blind to the innate value of a human life.

I came away from this moving experience with three important reminders.

Praise God for our freedoms: I’m thankful that the ERLC is present in conversations about preserving religious freedom. 

No matter what happens next, we are free to raise our voices to defend the defenseless. Looking around at friends and strangers lifting up their voices as well as their banners was a moving experience. One of the most powerful moments was when a woman named Casey who has Down syndrome spoke on stage about the amazing opportunities she has had and the love and joy in her family. “I love my life!”, she exclaimed. In our global context, petitioning the government with hope and joy is a rare sight, and one to be treasured. 

Embrace interfaith and interdenominational efforts: The pro-life movement is a team effort and an opportunity to unite with our neighbors. 

The March for Life embodies unity among differences—it is a tapestry of diverse yet allied voices from many religions, and especially many Christian denominations. As I walked next to Jesuit, Catholic, and Lutheran brothers and sisters, just to name a few, I was inspired to learn more about their beliefs and lifestyles. I was challenged to see them as teammates instead of strangers with whom I see differently on important theological matters.

We may have different approaches to defending the defenseless, but it is our collective efforts at the local level that affect individual decisions for life.

Proceed faithfully: Our pro-life work should reflect our Savior.

One reason I was hesitant about coming to the March for Life in years’ past is because I feared being associated with messages that didn’t represent the truth, grace, and mercy of Jesus. My friends who counsel post-abortive women have seen the harm of shameful messaging targeted at women who chose abortion. However, my worries about insensitivity at the March proved largely untrue, at least in 2023.

Like any collaboration of imperfect humans, there is going to be some messiness, and to those in our churches who have been shamed pre- or post-abortion, I am truly sorry. Together we must proceed faithfully, holding tightly to Jesus’ example when he interacted with those considered by society to be the worst of sinners, like in this powerful scene: 

“And the scribes of the Pharisees, when they saw that he was eating with sinners and tax collectors, said to his disciples, ‘Why does he eat with tax collectors and sinners?’ On hearing this, Jesus said to them, ‘It is not the healthy who need a doctor, but the sick. I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners’” (Mark 2:16-17 ESV).

It was 49 years ago that that the first March for Life was held on Capitol Hill following the Supreme Court’s Roe vs. Wade decision in 1973, a case that fabricated a Constitutional “right to abortion” and led to abortion access in every state. Since then, the pro-life community has opened pregnancy care centers, called on members of Congress to enact policies that help inform mothers about abortion and its alternatives, adopted children who were born into adversity, and faithfully marched. Every single year, whether in deep snow, rain, or cold, thousands have marched to stand up for the rights of the voiceless in the United States.  

Throughout my lifetime, I hope to see many victories for the preborn, for the disabled community, for those at the end of life, and others who are silenced and prevented from living the life God gave them. When the decisions don’t go our way, we must continue to exercise our freedoms to assemble and petition. When enemies try to divide our movement and our churches with strife, we must remain unified and focused. When we make judgements and mistakes in the process, we must proceed faithfully, centered on the compassion of Christ.

Moving forward, the movement will change with policy and culture, and the essential work of Southern Baptist churches and the broader pro-life movement must continue. My experience at the March inspired me to keep going until abortion is unthinkable in America and around the world, and I hope you will too.

By / Jan 20

In this episode, Brent interviews Jon Nelson, a pastor in Missouri, about racial unity and the SBC. Lindsay also reviews a few pieces of ERLC content focused on life in light of the 2023 March for Life.  

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  • Internships | While it may seem early, now is the time when many college students begin planning for their Summer 2023 internships. You likely already know this if you have a college student in your life—whether it’s in your own household, or your church ministry. At the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, we believe strongly in investing in the next generation. Our internship program exists to prepare students and young professionals with a gospel-centered, kingdom-focused perspective on the issues of everyday life. Interns come alongside ERLC staff to equip church leaders to address complex ethical issues in their communities, local churches, and represent Southern Baptists to the United States government. They help write policy briefs, draft correspondence to congressional staff, assist with communication strategy, provide research on ethical debates, meet with state and federal Christian officials working in the public square, and so much more. In sum, ERLC Interns do much more than simple errands and coffee runs. If you know of a college student looking for an internship for summer 2023, or you are a college student in need of an internship, visit ERLC.com/interns to apply.
  • Psalm 139 | Thousands of women are now traveling to states where abortion is still legal. Abortion providers like Planned Parenthood are targeting these states by placing mobile abortion centers near the border to take advantage of vulnerable women. The need for lifesaving ultrasound machines is greater than ever. That’s where the Psalm 139 Project comes in. As an initiative of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, the Psalm 139 Project works on behalf of Southern Baptists to place ultrasound machines in pro-life clinics across the country. Will you help us save vulnerable lives in 2023 and beyond? When you partner with the Psalm 139 Project, 100% of your gift goes directly to placing ultrasound machines and training PRC staff and volunteers. All of our administrative costs are covered by the ongoing generosity of Southern Baptists through the Cooperative Program. That’s what makes us unique — and that’s why partnering with us will make a real, tangible difference. Learn more and partner with us at ERLC.com/psalm139.
By / Jan 18

The March For Life will take place this week in Washington, D.C., beginning on the National Mall and proceeding to the steps of the Supreme Court. Hundreds of thousands of men, women, and children walk this path to advocate for the dignity and protection of human life, especially in its most vulnerable form, that of life in the womb. This year, they will also in march in celebration of the historic overturning of Roe v. Wade.

I was fortunate to be among those who marched a few years ago, and as we made our way through the streets, past monolithic buildings, and historic landmarks in our nation’s capital, I thought about what would come next, after the march was over. When the peaceful chants could no longer be heard and the decorated signs displaying pro-life views had been stacked in the recycling bins, as we all climbed into Ubers or hurried into local coffee shops and restaurants to rest our legs or escape the cold, would we find ourselves decidedly more pro-life than before the march began?

I hope the answer is yes. It is for me. While the march is a powerful and even emotional experience, I am challenged to not let a demonstration be the end of my pro-life advocacy for the year. Even while Roe has been overturned, there are many involved in the ongoing work needed to ensure that our government be held more accountable for protecting human dignity for all. There are also heroes among us who are serving tirelessly in pregnancy centers and clinics, not to mention the countless ministries and churches who commit to serving the women and men in crisis due to unplanned pregnancies each year.

If spending a few days in Washington taught me anything, it was that the opportunities to stand for life are endless. Even when we are not participating in organized efforts, our call as Christians to love our neighbors and and our belief that every person is created in the image of God compels us to live pro-life. 

What your church can do

As I think about what this looks like in a practical sense, and how the application of a gospel-based pro-life ethic will look different for every person, I’m brought to the realization that this all comes together within the context of the local church. Sometimes churches, and especially church leaders, may feel as if pro-life ministry is yet another work they ought to be doing, while at the same time feel they are failing miserably.

However, the more I consider how my own church can do a better job of fostering a pro-life culture, the more I’m convinced that the steps are small and doable for almost any pastor, leader, or member to begin today. Here are a few that come to mind:

1. Look for and support the pro-life efforts already happening in your church

There is a good chance that church members in your congregation are already engaged passionately in fighting for life. Begin having conversations with your members, asking around for anyone who is involved in ministries like foster care, pregnancy center support, or serving those with special needs. If your church actively preaches the gospel and teaches a Christian worldview, it is very likely that disciples of Christ are already at work. As church leaders, we have the opportunity to encourage and empower them (Eph. 4:12).

It can be difficult to gain traction quickly when launching a new ministry or focus in your church, especially when you and your fellow staff or volunteers are busy with the administrative duties of running a church. Rely on your church members already carrying the baton to let you know where the pro-life work is happening and how the church can better resource its members to engage even more deeply in those efforts.

2. Teach a whole-life, pro-life view to your church members 

It is impossible to teach the Word of God accurately and miss God’s desire for human flourishing. Genesis to Revelation reveal that he is the author of our lives, faith, and salvation; so, we must obey his commands. From the senior pastor down to the small group Bible study leader, the local church needs to teach a pro-life ethic that is consistent with and rooted in Scripture.

As church leaders, we have a responsibility to help people see their own role in caring about human dignity and the protection of life, especially in its most vulnerable forms. It’s not “too political” to advocate for issues of life from the pulpit when your authority is the Word of God (2 Tim. 3:16-17) and your church is filled with grace and love for people who have not always valued life.

3. Commit to educating yourself and your people toward a fuller pro-life ethic

In the same way that we grow in the understanding and knowledge of God when we read and learn his Word, we have an opportunity to grow in understanding on many issues surrounding the protection and flourishing of life. As leaders or members in the church, we need to be learners, not to be inflated by knowledge but to live and work for the good of those around us who might see our good deeds and give glory to God (Matt. 5:16).

Attend a conference, and learn from professionals working to advance life across the board: in special needs ministry and advocacy, in immigration reform, in human trafficking rescue, and in anti-abortion legislation. We cannot be experts in everything, or even several things. Inviting church members, perhaps even paying their way when resources allow, to join you in educating yourself on issues of life sends a strong message that you care about human dignity and how to better incorporate a pro-life ethic into your church and city.

4. Evaluate the priorities of your church

As a church leader, you carry the important and difficult responsibility of deciding which environments and programs your church will offer to foster discipleship. Strategic decision-making is important in churches that want to see growth in Christ. As such, it is important to ask if your church shares opportunities for members to engage in pro-life work, whether formally through set ministries or informally by sharing stories of church members engaged in parachurch ministry.

This is not to say that if your church doesn’t have a full-blown orphan care ministry complete with its own budget and staff that your church isn’t fulfilling the commands of Scripture. For example, our church supports ministries like our local pregnancy center through financial giving, participating in local advocacy efforts, and by encouraging church members to volunteer. We know that their staff is doing work that our church is not equipped to do on its own.

However, if we find that we are caring for our members without equipping them to live on mission, then we need to re-evaluate. What’s more, if we find that our ministries are catering to the comfort and satisfaction of our church members and not to reaching out to a lost culture around us, then it’s time to repent.

5. Celebrate the diversity of opportunities for pro-life ministry

We need every member of the body of Christ to fulfill the Great Commission and help build the church (1 Cor. 12). We also need every follower of Christ to envision a world that values the sanctity and dignity of human life, and to work toward that end. There are wonderful and abundant opportunities to engage in pro-life work.

In my former church in the states, I knew of members pursuing adoption, fostering children, counseling survivors of sex trafficking, volunteering at the local pregnancy center, caring for refugees, and preparing to move overseas to share the gospel in foreign places. If you see a lack of energy in your church toward pro-life causes, it’s time to practice what you preach.

Starting a ministry isn’t the only way to support pro-life work—host a foster care education class, take a small group to your local pregnancy center to volunteer, or give to a supply drive for single moms choosing life. These needs exist in our communities, and unless we make the theoretical practical for our church members, a pro-life worldview won’t connect as deeply as when the stories and testimonies are coming from our own church members.

The March For Life is held in January to coincide with the Supreme Court Case of Roe, the outcome of which legalized abortion in the United States. For almost 50 years, the conviction that every human being deserves life has made its way through the heart of our nation’s capital. And God has honored the millions of prayers for preborn children in the overturning of Roe. Now, our prayers and work turn to the state level where we proclaim the absolute sanctity of every human life.

God is still listening, and he has not been silent. No one is more pro-life than God, and in his great mercy and love for his people, he has also extended grace to those who have chosen abortion or compromised the dignity of a human life. Nothing is more pro-life than the gospel, and so gospel work is pro-life work. In our freedom and our ability to do so, we, as followers of Christ, must pray and consider how we will enter into this work individually and corporately. The needs are great and the opportunities are abundant. Let’s make sure our churches are the places where women and children are most dignified for God’s glory.

By / Jan 13

In this episode, Lindsay and Brent discuss the South Carolina Supreme Court striking down the state’s 6-week abortion ban. They also talk about the pro-life organization and the March for Life happening next week.

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  • Dobbs Resource Page | The release of the Dobbs decision marks a true turning point in the pro-life movement, a moment that Christians, advocates and many others have worked toward tirelessly for 50 years. Let us rejoice that we live in a nation where past injustices can still be corrected, as we also roll our sleeves up to save preborn lives, serve vulnerable mothers, and support families in our communities. To get more resources on this case, visit ERLC.com/Dobbs.
  • Sexual Ethics Resource Page | Do you ever feel overwhelmed by the constant stream of entertainment and messages that challenge the Bible’s teachings on sexual ethics? It often feels like we’re walking through uncharted territory. But no matter what we face in our ever-shifting culture, God’s design for human sexuality has never changed. The ERLC’s new sexual ethics resource page is full of helpful articles, videos, and explainers that will equip you to navigate these important issues with truth and grace. Get these free resources at ERLC.com/sexualethics.
By / Jan 21

Today is the 49th Annual March for Life, and it could potentially be the last one before the disastrous precedents in Roe and Casey are overturned by the Dobbs case. Advocates for life have longed for the day our laws will protect the most vulnerable among us — the little ones in the womb. The March for Life is the world’s largest human rights gathering, and it’s an incredibly powerful display of commitment to the protection of the preborn. Nellie Gray, the founder of the march, “after realizing congressional protection of the unborn was not on the horizon, decided to hold a March for Life every year until Roe v. Wade is overturned.” 

In December 2021, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in a case titled Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization. The Dobbs case reviewed a Mississippi law titled the “Gestational Age Act” that prohibits abortions after 15 weeks except in a medical emergency and in cases of severe fetal abnormality. This law replaces the ‘viability standard’ created by Roe with a limit on abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy. The issue the court examined is whether pre-viability prohibitions on elective abortions are unconstitional. 

Dobbs is a once-in-a-generation opportunity for the court to overturn the harmful precedents in Roe and Casey. With each passing day, more and more people recognize preborn lives are worthy of protection. The Dobbs case provides another chance for the court to come to that same conclusion and affirm the fundamental right to life. If decided favorably, this case would potentially expand protections for children in the early stages of gestational development.

Where the March for Life continues

While the March for Life is an important annual event for pro-lifers to promote the innate dignity and worth of every single person, the real work happens in our homes, our churches, our neighborhoods, and our communities. Every one of us has an essential role to play in changing views on abortion, because we are uniquely situated to love our neighbors.

If Dobbs is decided favorably, abortion won’t end overnight. Instead, abortion will be sent back to the states. The need to care for vulnerable women and their preborn babies will increase, and Christians must be ready and willing to stand in the gap and provide care.

While we work to ensure that our laws protect the preborn, we also must work toward a day when abortion is unthinkable and unnecessary. Scripture is clear that every life has innate dignity and worth, and that abortion ends the life of a preborn baby. The reason women choose abortions varies greatly, from believing that a child will hamper their professional growth and abilities, to not desiring to parent a child at that point in their lives, to feeling as if they can’t provide for a child. Our response to abortion must be as multifaceted as the reasons women choose to abort. Solutions can’t be one size fits all. Because each woman has unique needs, we should care for her and her child individually.

How we can pray 

There are dozens of ways we can get involved in caring for women and their children, and we should prayerfully discern how the Lord is leading us to engage. Personally, I’ve served in a variety of capacities at different times and different seasons throughout my life. But each one of us can regularly pray for abortion to end and for a day when a woman doesn’t feel like her only choice is an abortion. Here are some other ways you can pray: 

  • Pray that every woman facing an unplanned pregnancy would be surrounded by a caring community who’ll support and love her.
  • Pray that women’s hearts will be changed and they will choose life for their children.
  • Pray that more people would get involved in becoming foster or adoptive parents.
  • Pray that the church would be the safest place for vulnerable women and their children.
  • Pray that laws would be passed that protect life.

How we can serve

In addition, there are countless ways to get involved in serving in the pro-life movement. I encourage you to spend some time discerning through prayer how the Lord is calling you to serve. Below are just a few ways to get involved:

  • Volunteer at your local pregnancy resource center.
  • Financially support a pregnancy resource center or a pro-life ministry.
  • Throw a baby shower for a woman who’s choosing life for her baby.
  • Consider volunteering as a CASA (court appointed special advocate for children and youth in fostercare).
  • Consider becoming a foster or adoptive parent.
  • Support foster or adoptive parents in your local community.
  • Help women access child care resources.
  • Teach a parenting class.

As we continue to work toward a day when our laws protect the little ones in the womb and abortion is both unthinkable and unnecessary, may we do so with the love, grace, and kindness of Christ. Our words and deeds — whether interacting with pro-choice advocates, helping a mother choose life, or ministering to the woman who has had an abortion — should ultimately point others to the grace, forgiveness, and salvation that Christ offers.

By / Jan 21

Each year the March for Life — which is the world’s largest human rights demonstration — is held on or around the anniversary of the United States Supreme Court’s decision legalizing abortion in the case Roe v. Wade. The first March for Life was held in the nation’s capital on Jan. 22, 1974 — exactly one year after the Roe decision was announced. Since then evangelicals across the country have returned each year to support the overall goal of the march to “end abortion by uniting, educating, and mobilizing pro-life people in the public square.”

Evangelical involvement early on

When the original march began, though, abortion was still considered a “Roman Catholic issue.” While individual evangelicals may have opposed abortion, many major Protestant groups were either silent on the issue or supportive of abortion in some way. For example, in 1971, the leadership of the Christian Life Commission (later reconstituted as the ERLC) even supported a resolution — which was later adopted at the SBC annual meeting — that called upon Southern Baptists to “work for legislation that will allow the possibility of abortion under such conditions as rape, incest, clear evidence of severe fetal deformity, and carefully ascertained evidence of the likelihood of damage to the emotional, mental, and physical health of the mother.”

At the time, SBC leadership was not out of alignment with local churches on the issue. A poll conducted by the Baptist Sunday School Board in 1970 found that 70% of SBC pastors supported abortion to protect the mental or physical health of the mother (which is the core rationale in the Roe decision), 64% supported abortion in cases of fetal deformity, and 71% in cases of rape. Evangelical leaders would eventually adopt the pro-life cause, but at the time of Roe the primary opposition was being led by Catholic activists like Nellie Gray. 

How the initial march came to be

In 1973, Gray was in her late 40s and working as a lawyer in the Labor Department. “It was such a shock to think that anyone would kill an innocent human being,” she told a television interviewer. To allow abortion, she said, was out of character for a nation that had recently passed civil rights laws and had helped at the Nuremberg trials to convict Nazis of crimes against humanity.

Since she was familiar with Washington, D.C., other Catholic activists reached out to her about holding a rally on the first anniversary of Roe in 1974. “I received a call from the Knights of Columbus,” said Gray. “I didn’t even know who they were, but they explained their stance against abortion and needed a place to meet to discuss plans for a march. That place was my living room. About 30 people gathered there and they asked if I could help get speakers for the event since I knew Capitol Hill well.

“What I couldn’t get was a master of ceremonies for the event,” she said. “Politicians didn’t want to get involved in a march, and people at that time weren’t interested in marches after the civil rights movement and other things. That left the emcee job to me.

The initial march was intended to be a one-time event. But since there were still funds left over, the organizers used them to launch the March for Life Education and Defense Fund. Gray retired from her government job to become a full-time pro-life activists, running the organization from her home. Before her death in 2012, Gray had attended every March for Life, which at the time totaled 38 rallies.

The original March in 1974 was attended by 20,000 pro-lifers. By 2003, the event brought in around 250,000 attendees each year. In the past few years, however, an estimated 300,000–400,000 people braved the cold to attend the D.C march.

Over the past few decades, the march became a focal point for pro-life organizing, with numerous events held in conjuction with the event. In 2016, ERLC and Focus on the Family hosted a major pro-life conference called Evangelicals For Life to advocate for preborn lives and vulnerable mothers, help increase awareness among evangelical Christians of the March for Life, and motivate them to participate.

This year’s March for Life events will begin with a rally today at 12 p.m. ET on the National Mall. Following the rally, the March will proceed up Constitution Avenue to the Supreme Court and Capitol Building.